Tag Archives: digital content

Apple scoops Iain Banks podcast novel first

In a book trade first, Iain Banks’s latest novel, ‘Transition’, is to become the first newly published book to be serialised internationally on iTunes.

Publisher Little, Brown Book Group has reached a deal to make an abridged audio version of the novel available as a free podcast. The first podcast will go live on September 3 when the novel is published. A further 22 episodes, each 15 minutes long, will be released on iTunes in the UK and US every Thursday and Saturday for 12 weeks.

Sarah Shrubb, editorial director of Little, Brown UK’s digital imprint Hachette Digital said: “This is the first time an audio has been serialised in this way, and we’re very excited to be doing something so groundbreaking. Iain Banks is one of Little, Brown’s biggest authors, and we’re absolutely delighted to be promoting him through this cutting-edge digital campaign.”

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We7 launches free music-on-demand service

We7 today officially launched its ads-supported music service, offering UK music lovers the chance to listen to whatever music they choose for free, and offering a chance to buy their favourite music.

The service’s extensive catalogue includes music from a three million strong catalogue of artists including Kings of Leon, Pink, Nickelback, and Estelle.

We7 is adding up to 30,000 tracks a day to its collection of over 3 million licensed tracks, including many new releases as they become available.
 
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Google ‘monetizes’ You Tube

Interesting, old news but more clarity. Not my find, unfortunately, that honour belongs to Motley Fool: “It seems Google’s going to give it a shot, according to YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley’s recent comments at a tech dinner in Palo Alto. “We’re integrating links to iTunes and Amazon for DVDs, CDs, and digital downloads,” he said. “A lot of our content does drive awareness for music or for TV shows or movies, and a lot of our partners are really just excited to make that connection between the two — going from promotional, getting people to tune into a TV show or buy a movie ticket — to that direct response in terms of clicking to buy something.””

The Holy Grail of this kind of vision is the ability to get hold of what you want, when you want it. What’s in the way of realising that is that not every media player is at the table, and, right now, if you are a huge fan of Chinese cinema, but live in Brazil, you have no immediate online resource to get that, then, there, as you please. Players must focus on the niche markets.